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Alaskan Bushwheels

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Alaskan Bushwheels

Necessity is the mother of invention, as they say. In the case of the Bushwheel, it was necessity coupled with that insatiable draw to those far places unreachable but by air. That's what the original inventors of the Alaskan Bushwheel gave the bush flying community: A tested and approved bush tire that gets pilots out into the wilds and back again safely.

Energy Absorption
Landing short often necessitates landing hard. Uncommonly pliable, Alaskan Bushwheels absorb the energy of those rough landings, taking the brunt of the impact off of your back, wheels, gear, and airframe.
Prop Clearance
Pretty simple, tall tires keep your nose high. This limits the chance of a prop strike during tricky ground maneuvers around scrubby thickets, over river rocks, and through tall grass.
Tube Free
Unlike your standard aircraft tire, Bushwheels are tubeless. This distinctive design eliminates the problem of tire slippage and stem shearing and makes it possible to run these tires at very low PSI.

NOT SURE WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING FOR?

The choice of Bushwheels depends on the pilot, their plane, and the way they want to fly. Here's what we generally recommend:

Flying a light sport aircraft?
A solid choice would be 26" or 29" Airstreaks.
First time upgrading from standard tube-type tires?
You might want to go for 26" Bushwheels.
Flying a Cessna, Maule, or heavier bush plane?
Most tend to chose 29" or 31" Bushwheels.
Want the ultimate go-to bush tire?
Choose 31" Bushwheels.
Want the most unapologetically large bush flying tire available?
That's the 35" Bushwheel.
Flying a Beaver of Pilatus?
Go for the robust 35" Beaver Bushwheel.
Frequently landing and taxiing on pavement?
That's not what Bushwheels are made for, but you can get similar functionality out of Airhawks.

STORAGE

  • If storing your plane for 30 days or more, remove weight off the tires. Better yet, remove your Bushwheels completely and install temporary standard tires.
  • Inflate tires to near maximum recommended air pressure if leaving them installed on the aircraft while stored.
  • Avoid storing tires on heat-absorbing, petroleum-based surfaces like asphalt. In cold weather, don’t let tires freeze to the ground. Combat both problems by placing plywood or dense plastic barriers between the tires and ground.

MAINTENANCE

  • Read and follow all instructions in the ICA that came with your Bushwheels.
  • Never inflate a tire with more than 1 PSI if not mounted on a wheel assembly.
  • Rotate tires every 100 hours or at your annual, whichever comes first. Rotate both side-to-side and on the wheel assembly itself so that valve stems point inboard one time and outboard the next.
  • Protect tires from UV and other extreme weather conditions. Cover them with vented plywood boxes painted white to reflect heat or use reflective vented soft covers. We also recommend applying 303 Aerospace Protectant monthly to combat UV degredation
Bushwheel Covers
303 Aero Space Protectant

OPERATIONS

  • Make large radius turns instead of brake turns to minimize tire scrubbing.
  • Do not use excessive braking on landings when not required.
  • If possible, inflate tires with dry nitrogen.
  • Keep tires at their recommended air pressure and check before every flight.
  • Limit the length of paved-runway taxis by landing close to your final parking spot (only if it can be done safely).

TIPS FOR BUYING USED BUSHWHEELS

SERIAL NUMBERS

  • Serial numbers are 7 digits. Earlier versions were preceded by 3 letters, ABI or ATR. ABI is Alaskan Bushwheel Inc. and ATR is Alaska Tire and Rubber. ATR was used on the earliest tires made at Fire Lake prior to Oregon.
  • During Oregan’s production both prefixes were used, but we dropped the prefix when Airframes took over production.
  • The first 4 digits of the number indicates the year, then the month of manufacture. For example 1404XXX would be April of 2014 mfg. Early tires were 6 digits, where the first digit was the year and then month of mfg; 910XXX would be Oct 1999. All tires built before June of 2000 were built before certification and are not able to be covered by our STC.

PLANT CODE

  • The other way to tell if tires can be used under our STC is the plant code. That appears in the large block of lettering along with the TSO number, inflation pressure, and load rating.
  • The plant code appears as either PC7AK or PC7AKO. The AK/AKO indicates it was either built in Alaska or Alaska/Oregon. Only tires with PC7AKO plant codes are STCable.

WEAR SIGNS

  • As an aside there is no way to determine wear of the tire externally for the most part. The only indications the tire may not be usable are the presence of exposed cording or weather checking. Any exposed cord renders the tire non-airworthy and should be avoided. Weather checking is not fatal but obviously not preferred. Small cracks around the valve stem and letters are actually fairly normal even for tires of somewhat recent manufacture.
  • Typical lifespan of a tire is 7-12 years however that can vary a tremendous amount based on storage and use on pavement. Checking the manufacture date is a good way of telling if the WEAR SIGNS tires still have some life in them or not.

STC's

  • STC’s are not transferrable from one aircraft to another as once they are filed for one aircraft it is a permanent part of that aircraft’s logbooks. For the tires to be used on a new aircraft the owner has to buy a new copy of the STC for that plane.
  • If the tires are airworthy and have the correct year of manufacture and plant code to be able to issue an STC we can sell the customer a copy of the STC. STC re-issues are $50 per copy plus postage. We require the serial number on both tires for the STC and of course the $50. STC’s can be picked up in person at AF Birchwood or Reeve and also be ordered over the phone.

Alaskan Bushwheels

Necessity is the mother of invention, as they say. In the case of the Bushwheel, it was necessity coupled with that insatiable draw to those far places unreachable but by air. That's what the original inventors of the Alaskan Bushwheel gave the bush flying community: A tested and approved bush tire that gets pilots out into the wilds and back again safely.

Energy Absorption
Landing short often necessitates landing hard. Uncommonly pliable, Alaskan Bushwheels absorb the energy of those rough landings, taking the brunt of the impact off of your back, wheels, gear, and airframe.
Prop Clearance
Pretty simple, tall tires keep your nose high. This limits the chance of a prop strike during tricky ground maneuvers around scrubby thickets, over river rocks, and through tall grass.
Tube Free
Unlike your standard aircraft tire, Bushwheels are tubeless. This distinctive design eliminates the problem of tire slippage and stem shearing and makes it possible to run these tires at very low PSI.

NOT SURE WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING FOR?

The choice of Bushwheels depends on the pilot, their plane, and the way they want to fly. Here's what we generally recommend:

Flying a light sport aircraft?
A solid choice would be 26" or 29" Airstreaks.
First time upgrading from standard tube-type tires?
You might want to go for 26" Bushwheels.
Flying a Cessna, Maule, or heavier bush plane?
Most tend to chose 29" or 31" Bushwheels.
Want the ultimate go-to bush tire?
Choose 31" Bushwheels.
Want the most unapologetically large bush flying tire available?
That's the 35" Bushwheel.
Flying a Beaver of Pilatus?
Go for the robust 35" Beaver Bushwheel.
Frequently landing and taxiing on pavement?
That's not what Bushwheels are made for, but you can get similar functionality out of Airhawks.

STORAGE

  • If storing your plane for 30 days or more, remove weight off the tires. Better yet, remove your Bushwheels completely and install temporary standard tires.
  • Inflate tires to near maximum recommended air pressure if leaving them installed on the aircraft while stored.
  • Avoid storing tires on heat-absorbing, petroleum-based surfaces like asphalt. In cold weather, don’t let tires freeze to the ground. Combat both problems by placing plywood or dense plastic barriers between the tires and ground.

MAINTENANCE

  • Read and follow all instructions in the ICA that came with your Bushwheels.
  • Never inflate a tire with more than 1 PSI if not mounted on a wheel assembly.
  • Rotate tires every 100 hours or at your annual, whichever comes first. Rotate both side-to-side and on the wheel assembly itself so that valve stems point inboard one time and outboard the next.
  • Protect tires from UV and other extreme weather conditions. Cover them with vented plywood boxes painted white to reflect heat or use reflective vented soft covers. We also recommend applying 303 Aerospace Protectant monthly to combat UV degredation
Bushwheel Covers
303 Aero Space Protectant

OPERATIONS

  • Make large radius turns instead of brake turns to minimize tire scrubbing.
  • Do not use excessive braking on landings when not required.
  • If possible, inflate tires with dry nitrogen.
  • Keep tires at their recommended air pressure and check before every flight.
  • Limit the length of paved-runway taxis by landing close to your final parking spot (only if it can be done safely).

TIPS FOR BUYING USED BUSHWHEELS

SERIAL NUMBERS

  • Serial numbers are 7 digits. Earlier versions were preceded by 3 letters, ABI or ATR. ABI is Alaskan Bushwheel Inc. and ATR is Alaska Tire and Rubber. ATR was used on the earliest tires made at Fire Lake prior to Oregon.
  • During Oregan’s production both prefixes were used, but we dropped the prefix when Airframes took over production.
  • The first 4 digits of the number indicates the year, then the month of manufacture. For example 1404XXX would be April of 2014 mfg. Early tires were 6 digits, where the first digit was the year and then month of mfg; 910XXX would be Oct 1999. All tires built before June of 2000 were built before certification and are not able to be covered by our STC.

PLANT CODE

  • The other way to tell if tires can be used under our STC is the plant code. That appears in the large block of lettering along with the TSO number, inflation pressure, and load rating.
  • The plant code appears as either PC7AK or PC7AKO. The AK/AKO indicates it was either built in Alaska or Alaska/Oregon. Only tires with PC7AKO plant codes are STCable.

WEAR SIGNS

  • As an aside there is no way to determine wear of the tire externally for the most part. The only indications the tire may not be usable are the presence of exposed cording or weather checking. Any exposed cord renders the tire non-airworthy and should be avoided. Weather checking is not fatal but obviously not preferred. Small cracks around the valve stem and letters are actually fairly normal even for tires of somewhat recent manufacture.
  • Typical lifespan of a tire is 7-12 years however that can vary a tremendous amount based on storage and use on pavement. Checking the manufacture date is a good way of telling if the WEAR SIGNS tires still have some life in them or not.

STC's

  • STC’s are not transferrable from one aircraft to another as once they are filed for one aircraft it is a permanent part of that aircraft’s logbooks. For the tires to be used on a new aircraft the owner has to buy a new copy of the STC for that plane.
  • If the tires are airworthy and have the correct year of manufacture and plant code to be able to issue an STC we can sell the customer a copy of the STC. STC re-issues are $50 per copy plus postage. We require the serial number on both tires for the STC and of course the $50. STC’s can be picked up in person at AF Birchwood or Reeve and also be ordered over the phone.
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Alaskan Bushwheel 199-62A Wheel and Brake Assembly Alaskan Bushwheel (ABI) 199-62A Wheel and Brake Assembly

Part No: ABI-199-62A
6-bolt, 1 1/2" aluminum direct replacement for a 199-62A Cleveland wheel and brake assembly
.

PRICE: $2,450.00
Alaskan Bushwheels 35" Beaver Bushwheel 35" Beaver Bushwheel

Sturdy backcountry bush tire designed for use on Pilatus and Beaver aircraft.

PRICE: $2,443.00
Alaskan Bushwheel 199-71 Wheel and Brake Assembly Alaskan Bushwheel (ABI) 199-71 Wheel and Brake Assembly

Part No: ABI-199-71
6-bolt, 1 1/4" axle, aluminum direct replacement for the Cleveland 199-71 wheel and brake kit.

PRICE: $2,400.00
35" Alaskan Bushwheels 35" Alaskan Bushwheel

The premier tire for extreme backcountry flying adventures.

PRICE: $2,035.00
Alaskan Bushwheel 199-62 Wheel and Brake Assembly Alaskan Bushwheel (ABI) 199-62 Wheel and Brake Assembly

Part No: ABI-199-62
3-bolt, 1 1/2" axle, aluminum direct replacement for the 199-62 Cleveland wheel and brake assembly.

PRICE: $1,950.00
31" Alaskan Bushwheels 31" Alaskan Bushwheel

The most popular Alaskan Bushwheel in the 49th state and lower 48.

PRICE: $1,831.00
29" Alaskan Bushwheels 29" Alaskan Bushwheel

Step up from the 26" Bushwheel with even more backcountry possibilities.

PRICE: $1,678.00
29" Airstreak Alaskan Bushwheel 29" Airstreak 2.0

Lightweight and durable certified 29" Airstreak tire designed for LSA.

PRICE: $1,494.00
26" Alaskan Bushwheel 26" Alaskan Bushwheel

Smallest and lightest Bushwheel and compatible with most aircraft.

PRICE: $1,474.00
10" x 6.50" Alaskan Bushwheel Assembly 10" x 6.50" Alaskan Bushwheel (ABI) Wheel Assembly

Part No: ABI-10650
10" X 6.50" wheel specifically designed for 35" Alaskan Bushwheels.

PRICE: $1,210.00
10" x 10" Alaskan Bushwheel Wheel Assembly 10" x 10" Alaskan Bushwheel (ABI) Wheel Assembly

Part No: ABI-1010
ABI wheel assembly for 4-ply 29" Airhawk tires or 6-ply 8.50x10s.

PRICE: $1,210.00
26" Airstreak Alaskan Bushwheel 26" Airstreak 2.0

Our lightest certified Bushwheel brand option available for light sport aircraft.

PRICE: $1,209.00
40-75T Alaskan Bushwheel (ABI) Cleveland 6" Wheel 40-75T ABI 6" Wheel

Part No: ABI-40-75T

PRICE: $870.00
40-60 Alaskan Bushwheel (ABI) Cleveland 6" Wheel 40-60 ABI 6" Wheel

Part No: ABI-40-60

PRICE: $795.00
Baby Bushwheel 11" Baby Bushwheel Tailwheel tire 11" Baby Bushwheel Tailwheel Tire

High flotation tailwheel tire.

PRICE: $454.00
Standard Taildragger Bogi Bar Standard Bogi Bar

Taildragger Bogi Bar sized for 3200 and 3400 tailwheels.

PRICE: $225.00
Baby Bushwheel Bogi Bar Alaskan Baby Bushwheel Bogi Bar

The handy Bogi Bar right-sized for Baby Bushwheel tailwheel.

PRICE: $225.00
Alaskan Bushwheels Tire Covers Tire Covers

Protect your Bushwheels investment with Alaskan-made big tire covers.

PRICE: $155.00
Backcountry Liquid Bag Valve Spout Backcountry Bag Spout

Backcountry ready spout and valve for use with the Airframes liquid containment bag.

PRICE: $45.90
Tire Sticker Kits Bushwheel Tire Sticker Kits

Show off  your tires with these attention grabbing lettering kits that fit Alaskan Bushwheels.

PRICE: $40.00
Alaskan Bushwheels Plug Kit Plug Kit

Tire repair kit in a handy plastic carrying case.

PRICE: $38.95
Orange Seal Tubeless Tire Sealant Subzero Orange Seal Tubeless Sealant - Subzero

Seal your Bushwheels from the inside out even when the temps drop Arctic low.

PRICE: $26.25
Orange Seal Tubeless Tire Sealant Endurance Orange Seal Tubeless Sealant

Seal your Bushwheels from the inside out.

PRICE: $26.25
Alaskan Bushwheels Small Patch Kit Small Patch Kit

Nine-piece Alaskan Bushwheels temporary patch repair kit.

PRICE: $15.00
Digital Low Pressure Tire Gauge w/ light Digital Low Pressure Tire Gauge w/ light

A must for running your Alaskan Bushwheels at the right PSI for the tire and the terrain.

PRICE: $13.50
303 Aerospace Protectant Aerospace Protectant 303 Aerospace Protectant

Highly recommended UV blocker for protecting your Alaskan Bushwheels from UV damage.

PRICE: $12.60
Low Pressure Tire Gauge Low Pressure Tire Gauge

Reads from 1 to 20 PSI.

PRICE: $10.50
   
 
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